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UK backing loans for 'risky' offshore oil drilling in Brazil


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#1 Ross1

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 10:40 AM

Make of it what you will. I think it's really sad how we are investing heavily in risky oil and not smart grids and renewables. Fast buck with a quick return. :wacko:


http://www.guardian....fshore-drilling

#2 ChrisR

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 12:22 PM

Make of it what you will. I think it's really sad how we are investing heavily in risky oil and not smart grids and renewables. Fast buck with a quick return. :wacko:


http://www.guardian....fshore-drilling


IMO a completely different kettle of fish as to what happened in the US. And why is it that deepwater drilling has now become risky?????

#3 Ross1

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 03:40 PM

IMO a completely different kettle of fish as to what happened in the US. And why is it that deepwater drilling has now become risky?????



Deep water drilling has always been risky?

As far as I'm aware deep water drilling is on the increase because convential fields are running out.

#4 ChrisR

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 03:51 PM

The press are making out that deepwater drilling is a new thing, but its not, we have deepwater here thats exploited and has been for 15 years or more. The problem that has occured can happen on any drilling/exploration rig Deepwater or not, that is utilizing a sub sea tree any drilling is risky, so they might as well cast the net over the whole industry, without even knowing what actually caused this disaster.

#5 Ross1

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 04:03 PM

The press are making out that deepwater drilling is a new thing, but its not, we have deepwater here thats exploited and has been for 15 years or more. The problem that has occured can happen on any drilling/exploration rig Deepwater or not, that is utilizing a sub sea tree any drilling is risky, so they might as well cast the net over the whole industry, without even knowing what actually caused this disaster.



This is 'extra' deep though no?

I thought the reason they cant stop the flowing of oil is because they didn't put in the correct safety measures, because of U.S de regulation and company cost cutting.

#6 ChrisR

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 04:22 PM

This is 'extra' deep though no?

I thought the reason they cant stop the flowing of oil is because they didn't put in the correct safety measures, because of U.S de regulation and company cost cutting.



Ross,

as far as im aware no cause for this has yet been released and all is just speculation as to what actually happened, one of those being the BOP stack that had not passed or was over its annual safety check, or its safety systems were not working correctly or something along those lines. Human error has also been speculated as usual!!

Most newer oilfields around the world are deepwater, ultra -deepwater is the next stage in drilling evolution

#7 Ross1

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 10:08 AM

I don't agree with beating up B.P alone. There are many faces behind the disaster. Deepwater Horizon is the symbol of the demise of a global experiment: a model of progress and development based on exploiting fossil fuels.

We receive more energy from the sun every day than what we need. But we are still digging up fossil fuels which we know are destroying our planet.

Greed and ideology are wrecking life on this once gorgeous planet. When will we have the courage to invent and realise a new age of solar and renewable energy?

We are heading for a 4 degree average global temperature rise by 2100. http://www.guardian....nland-ice-sheet

In its last assessment of the problem in 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) forecasts that a rise of more than 2C would lead to potential increases in food production, but an increasingly high risk of extinction for 20-30% of species, more severe droughts and floods, and a unstoppable "widespread to near total" loss of the Greenland ice sheet over very long time periods. However, at 4C it predicted global food production was "very likely" to decrease, "major extinctions around the globe", and near-total loss of Greenland's ice, precipitating 2-7m of sea-level rise in the long term. As temperatures rose, the severity of floods, erosion, water pollution, heatwaves, droughts and health problems such as malnutrition and diarrhoea diseases would also increase, said the IPCC.


What a future we are leaving for the next generation.........

#8 lindsay

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 10:13 AM

Never an easy one this,i think you could say there are too many of us on the planet who most of have a need for,in this case oil.I like most out there would like to see it extracted and used in a way that would not endanger the planet,if at all possible.
Ross did you see that programmer a while back from the guy from eastenders about the oil that was left leaking from disused well heads,polluting and being wasted,this is not the norm but the kind of thing we as a population need to curve.

#9 Ross1

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 10:18 AM

Never an easy one this,i think you could say there are too many of us on the planet who most of have a need for,in this case oil.I like most out there would like to see it extracted and used in a way that would not endanger the planet,if at all possible.
Ross did you see that programmer a while back from the guy from eastenders about the oil that was left leaking from disused well heads,polluting and being wasted,this is not the norm but the kind of thing we as a population need to curve.


Hi Linds,

As far as I'm aware there is no way of burning oil that doesn't damage the planet, unless you capture the co2, but that's unproven in many ways. As we are finding out extraction is a disaster for the environment too. There all oil spills all around the world, all of the time, we are only hearing about this one because it's in the USA. The ones in Africa and the ones all through the Amazon don't get reported because they are only effecting some small time poor people, not rich westerners. The Canadian tar sands, are an environmental disaster but they still keep doing it.....the process nearly uses as much energy to extract it than what it yeilds. But because north america is addicted to oil they need it, and lots of it.

I keep thinking how many solar panels and offshore wind farms could they have built with all the money they are paying through clean up and compensation (compensation which will never really compensate what they have done to people and the environment?

It's easy to blame population on the environmental peril that we face, but it's not really the biggest problem. It's how we are living that is the real problem. Rich countries are eating up the worlds natural resources not the poor. Rich countries populations peaked years ago, yet per person we consume a massive amount more than the poor. China is the world biggest producer of co2 now, but that is only because it is making all the consumer goods for Europe and the U.S. When you compare emmisons per head against China and the U.S the U.S are much higher per person, this is because of the high consumption life styles they lead.

I've been following this for years now and the problems to our energy needs are there, whether the political will ever be good enough, "globally" is anyones guess. But now I have come to realise that even if we decoupled from high carbon energys etc, we still need to tackle consumption, and our present economic system relys on growth. We need to find a way where we can "all" prosper and flourish as people but without more and more economic growth. Because growth is just a measure of consumption of the worlds natural resources and this planet has finite resources and many ecological limits (co2 in the atmosphere,fish in the sea, soil degradation, etc) .

We are all told that GDP is the indicator to watch but it doesn't measure how happy we are,crime rates,our environment, our health, the state of our natural resources etc. We need to start thinking outside of the box because this experiment is not working and we are sleep walking to disaster.

#10 karnivor

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 11:29 AM

There is a very simple way of harnessing the sun for power, its been happening for millions of years.

We grow trees and then burn them. we then utilise the released co2 to grow more trees. It works really well.

TBH threads like these make me smile as it only demonstrates how blinkered we are as a species......thats right.....species.

We worry about burning fossil fuels, but dont see the looming disasters that we are building up for ourselves by making Murder illegal, or by developing medicine.

We happilly stand back and watch other species kill each other in the knowledge that "it strengthens the breed", hell we even help things along by culling.
However, we are too narrow minded to see our own species being weakened by not selectively breeding the strongest.
We are now so reliant on medication that we would probably shrivel up and die without it. We cant even give birth reliably without the assistance of medics these days, such is our understanding of what man needs to suceed.

We seem to set ourselves apart from the rest of the animal kingdom.

TBH, the sooner man exits earth, the better. We are a failed experiment....bacteria rule supreme.
Why do left-over nuts never match left-over bolts?

#11 Ross1

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 12:53 PM

There is a very simple way of harnessing the sun for power, its been happening for millions of years.

We grow trees and then burn them. we then utilise the released co2 to grow more trees. It works really well.

TBH threads like these make me smile as it only demonstrates how blinkered we are as a species......thats right.....species.

We worry about burning fossil fuels, but dont see the looming disasters that we are building up for ourselves by making Murder illegal, or by developing medicine.

We happilly stand back and watch other species kill each other in the knowledge that "it strengthens the breed", hell we even help things along by culling.
However, we are too narrow minded to see our own species being weakened by not selectively breeding the strongest.
We are now so reliant on medication that we would probably shrivel up and die without it. We cant even give birth reliably without the assistance of medics these days, such is our understanding of what man needs to suceed.

We seem to set ourselves apart from the rest of the animal kingdom.

TBH, the sooner man exits earth, the better. We are a failed experiment....bacteria rule supreme.





We used to get our energy from trees. But then we cut them all down. It's only the worlds poorest people that get there energy from trees.

I think you make good points. But there really is an immediate threat of energy supply and global climate change from us burning fossil fuels and deforestation. Medication isn't going anywhere fast, I can't see how we can change that, I cant see why it's that much of a problem, not unless you think our only problem is population and you think there should be less people?

We can get ourselves off fossil fuel, we are clever enough and have the technology to do that. problem is we are fast approaching a point of atmospheric co2 concentration that the worlds leading scientists say could well lock us into a warming world and will trigger natural feedback mechanisms, like methane from the perma frosts and less reflection and more absorbtion of the suns energy by the lack of polar ice caps from warming.

We can live more sustainably too, it will be bl*8dy hard though mainly because consumerism is thrown in our faces 24/7.

#12 Ross1

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 10:25 AM

I would just like to add I don't buy the "don't do anything, it's futile" argument.


I am not willing to give up on the Human Race just yet. Yes, we're a nasty lot but I'm sort of fond of some of them.

We could well fail, but while there's a chance that we can preserve the amazing amount of life on this planet we should strive with all the power we have to conserve that.




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